immigration

National | World | Economic History | Pop Eco | Interactive Articles

Federal election 2019: A primer on immigration policy

Immigration is an ever-present issue in the political debate. Discourse on immigration policy has still been dominated by the need to find a solution to the 950 refugees, currently stuck on offshoring processing centers[1]. This issue is complicated by the need to counterbalance resettlement, whilst, preventing the practice of ‘people smuggling’. According to the UN, …

Read moreFederal election 2019: A primer on immigration policy

The Fall of the Trump Travel Ban

After the block of both Trump travel bans, abuse of executive powers is at the forefront of American political discourse. Laura Waring outlines how the Administration tried and failed to ban a substantial portion of the Muslim world from being able to travel to the United States.

Editors' Picks — 10th May 2015

In this week’s Editors’ Picks, we continue to monitor news surrounding the Australian budget deficit; we look at how the budget fell through, and new proposals to combat the situation. We also consider how changing the minimum wage rate may impact on employment and how to cope knowing a marketing crash is inevitable.

Opening the front door wider

The Comprehensive Plan of Action for Indochinese Refugees (CPA) has been praised for upholding ‘international solidarity’ and responding to what was the burgeoning refugee crisis of 1989.[1] It has also been criticised for its execution, with critics arguing that it is an example of international buck-passing and questionable compromises. Regardless, the CPA has since affirmed itself as a practical model that allowed policy makers to combine humanitarian principles of compassion with political pragmatism.

Read moreOpening the front door wider

The economics behind the asylum seeker policy

 

This article is one of two Q&A specials informing the reader on a topic of economic importance to Australia that was discussed by the panel on the night.

Background

On the 19th of July this year, Kevin Rudd introduced the PNG solution whereby any asylum seeker arriving by boat without a visa will be processed, and if found to be a legitimate refugee will be resettled in Papua New Guinea.

Read moreThe economics behind the asylum seeker policy

Enough chairs to go around: Immigration and employment

Most of us would have played the game of musical chairs when we were younger. The game is simple. There is a fixed amount of chairs and there are always more people than chairs. Music plays and the players circle the chairs. When the music stops everybody tries to sit on a chair and those who fail are eliminated from the game. Whilst I have nothing against this game, having derived much entertainment and joy from it as a child, it is problematic when people view the labour market as a game of musical chairs.
The musical chairs analogy came from an Athenian economics professor named Antigone Lyberaki in a recent IQ2 debate on EU immigration. She was arguing against the motion that “Europe should shut the door on immigration” and made the point that most politicians misunderstand the relationship between immigration and employment. Many politicians view the labour market as a game of musical chairs. Lyberaki pointed out that the distinguishing feature is that in musical chairs the number of chairs is fixed whereas the number of jobs in an economy is not fixed.

Read moreEnough chairs to go around: Immigration and employment