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The EU QE experience so far

In March 2015 the EU started its QE program. For success to be achieved it must navigate the secondary bond market, secrecy in bond purchases, and Greece.

Monash versus Melbourne: The blow by blow

essa presidents
ESSA Presidents Dean Pagonis (Melbourne) and Matthew Vethecan (Monash) know there can be only one winner

As students from Monash and Melbourne converged on the heart of Clayton campus for the inaugural ESSA Monash versus Melbourne Economics debate, the tension crackling in the air was palpable. For the Melbourne team, losing to the new kids on the block would be an irrevocable stain on their self-perception. For the Monash team, the desire to reign supreme on their turf was a powerful driving force. The topic ‘The Eurozone Project is a Failure’ provided ample scope for intellectual sparring.

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The joy of debating economics … Seriously!

In an affirmation of the natural order of things, on Thursday night out at Monash University, the University of Melbourne team (composed of myself, 1st-year student Emad, and the incomparable Prof. Jeff Borland) took out a closely fought debate to determine whether the Eurozone has been a success or a failure. Across both teams there was much spirited debate over economic theory, the optimal design for policymaking interlaced with a great deal of jibing back and forth between two of the country’s most elite universities.

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Debunking of Iceland’s Economic Recovery

If we remember back to the days of the global financial crisis, one of the earliest and hardest hit countries in the European area was Iceland. Iceland was also the only country which made the fateful decision to not bailout the three largest banks in their country. This was not because they simply said ‘no’ like they did afterwards to the demands of the creditors of these banks in the UK and the Netherlands, but they simply could not afford to bailout these banks which held 10 times GDP worth of assets. By choosing not to bailout the banks it didn’t mean the domestic financial payments system collapsed as well, and without good reason detailed further in the article.

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