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Passing on a passion for teaching

ESSA and UniMelb Alumnus and Teach For Australia Associate Christopher Weinberg welcomes his former Professor, Neville Norman, to teach his Year 12 Economics class, and share his passion for teaching.

After 4 years of economics, now what?

So after four years at the university of Melbourne, studying economics and a bit of politics along the way, it’s suddenly all come to an end. Which feels odd because for the greater part of this year, my Honours year, the focus hasn’t been on finishing the degree, or my time at university for that matter, but instead it’s been on the arduous/dreaded/painful thesis and making sure it got completed by last week’s Monday deadline. You may have noticed a collective sigh go up across the Economics department on Monday afternoon as everyone submitted their papers.

Read moreAfter 4 years of economics, now what?

The US government shutdown – any end in sight?

What a joke.
Really, there isn’t anything else that can be said about the latest fiscal crisis in the United States. With the federal government shutting down most operations on the 1st of October, as the House of Representatives (controlled by the Republicans) and the Senate (controlled by the Democrats) couldn’t agree on a Continuing Resolution for the 2014 fiscal year.

Read moreThe US government shutdown – any end in sight?

Election 2013 – let’s talk tax reform!

This article forms part of an ongoing series looking at economic issues as Australia heads into the Federal Election. More coverage can be found on the Election 2013 page of ESSA’s website.
This election campaign has already seen its fair share of gaffes, negative ads and costings claims. Perhaps it’s time we debated the pressing need to reform our tax system, starting with the GST.

The Problem

As I watched ABC’s Q&A Monday episode, The National Economic Debate, I sat despairing at yet another missed opportunity to talk ambitiously about policy reforms in Australia. After an excellent question from the crowd about the merits of reforming the Goods and Services Tax (GST) to broaden its base and potentially increase the rate (whilst concurrently reducing and eliminating other inefficient and distortionary taxes), both Treasurer Chris Bowen and Shadow Treasurer Joe Hockey manoeuvred their way out of discussing what is a sensible reform. It was arguably the most disappointing element of what was a very entertaining and substantive debate between Bowen and Hockey that covered the breadth of economic issues facing Australia.

Read moreElection 2013 – let’s talk tax reform!