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The myths of university deregulation

With further deregulation of higher education on the horizon, some students are crying out against ‘corporate universities’. Alice He examines whether such concerns are justified.

Out of their league

One of the things that struck me most while on exchange at the University of North Carolina (UNC) is that it really is like being in a movie. While there are no meticulous canteen table partitions according to social status, on the playing field, which is where college spirit bursts forth – in the same zeal as American patriotism – the image is exactly like those scenes in Remember the Titans, Rudy, The Blind Side, etc…

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Equilibrium: the non-excludability of good ideas

Looking back on Equilibrium 2012 I find that yes, it is a review of ESSA’s year and yes it is a memoir, a keepsake, a gift to our members. It is also, more than anything a celebration of economic thought. It is about the thinking and sharing of ideas, which has been what ESSA is about all along. In light of the imminent launch of Equilibrium 2013, I look back on our inaugural publication and pull out some examples of our writers’ ideas. The ingenuity of some of these propositions makes for a riveting read, as is the captivating nature of all good ideas.

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The economics behind the asylum seeker policy

 

This article is one of two Q&A specials informing the reader on a topic of economic importance to Australia that was discussed by the panel on the night.

Background

On the 19th of July this year, Kevin Rudd introduced the PNG solution whereby any asylum seeker arriving by boat without a visa will be processed, and if found to be a legitimate refugee will be resettled in Papua New Guinea.

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Should you be studying?

From discussing the possibilities of making tertiary education more accessible, I now segue to the other side of the debate: Are there too many people getting university degrees, and are they worth it?
The issue is exacerbated in the US, where the stakes are so much higher. A college education not only incorporates all the learning during the years of your degree, but is also the quintessential cultural experience of every middle-class youth: from madly rushing fraternities, to playing beer pong at the pre-football match tailgate party, to sharing the best places on campus for an all-nighter before finals – there comes a time in every man’s life, and college is not that time. But behind all the fun are the hours spent working and the years of family planning to accumulate the college fund necessary to pay for the degree.
Peter Theil, American entrepreneur, venture capitalist, hedge fund manager, first outside investor in Facebook and all-round success-story offers his two cents:
“Education is a bubble in a classic sense…It’s basically extremely overpriced. People are not getting their money’s worth…And at the same time it is something that is incredibly intensely believed; there’s this sort of psycho-social component to people taking on these enormous debts when they go to college simply because that’s what everybody’s doing.”1

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